Nutrition and Your Immunity

Guest post by Kelly Hogan, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian who has worked within The Mount Sinai Hospital for the past three years, is now focusing on breast cancer nutrition for the Dubin Breast Center. Kelly provides individual counseling in the areas of wellness, weight management and symptom/side effect management, in addition to creating patient education and wellness programs.

Nutrition and Your ImmunityAlthough we usually can’t prevent illness one hundred percent (like how that cold your co-worker had the other day is now your cold, too), good nutrition can help boost immunity, and certain foods and nutrients may help you get from couch to normal life a bit quicker. Here are a few to think about incorporating into your day, whether you’re holed up with the sniffles already or trying to ward them off with all your might. Read more

How To Get The Most From a Doctor Visit (Hint: The average PCP visit is only 15 minutes)

Dr. Sarah Van WagnerWelcome back to Mount Sinai Queens’ brand new blog featuring useful news and tips to help you lead a healthier life. I am Dr. Sarah Van Wagner, a board-certified family medicine physician who works at Mount Sinai Queens’ Steinway Medical Group. Please remember that this information is not a substitute for direct medical advice.

Start with your reason for the visit – write it down and bring it with you. You will often see a medical assistant before you see the doctor. This person may ask about the reason for your visit. Don’t assume the reason was communicated. By stating your reason to both the doctor and the medical assistant, you are all in agreement for why you are there. Whether you say, “I haven’t been to the doctor for a long time and I need a checkup,” or “my kids have strep throat and now I have a sore throat and fever,” agreement on the reason for the visit is a strong start. Think ahead of time about what will leave you feeling highly satisfied after the visit. Let the doctor know this too! Read more

5 Ways to Thwart Winter Illness

Guest post by Raquela Suchinsky, MS, RD, a registered dietitian at The Mount Sinai Hospital. At Mount Sinai, Raquela focuses on nutritional management for oncology and traumatic brain injury populations.

Salad 1. Eat a wide variety of fruits and veggies (not just citrus!)

  • Contrary to popular belief, there is little scientific evidence to show that vitamin C (found in citrus fruit) helps ward off or prevent the common cold, however eating a wide range of fruits and vegetables is definitely beneficial. No specific nutrient or particular food fights off illness. Choosing from a large variety of fruits and vegetables with different colors provides a multitude of nutrients, which can work together to help bolster your immune system.

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Trigeminal Neuralgia … It’s a pain in the FACE!

Guest post by Joshua B. Bederson, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at Mount Sinai Health System and specialist in Trigeminal Neuralgia. To make an appointment with Dr. Bederson, call 212-241-2377.

Trigeminal Neuralgia, Treatments for Trigeminal Neuralgia, neurosurgery, painful facial condition, Mount Sinai

Trigeminal Neuralgia is a disorder with episodes of severe, stabbing, electric shock-like pain in the face as the result of a blood vessel or other lesion coming in contact with the trigeminal nerve. Contact with the trigeminal nerve causes excruciating pain on that side of the face, most commonly in the lower face and jaw, although it sometimes may occur around the nose and above the eye. Read more

Do I Need To Do Anything Special the First Time I See a Doctor (Hint: Health history is key)

Dr. Sarah Van WagnerWelcome back to Mount Sinai Queens’ brand new blog featuring useful news and tips to help you lead a healthier life. I am Dr. Sarah Van Wagner, a board-certified family medicine physician who works at Mount Sinai Queens’ Steinway Medical Group. Please remember that this information is not a substitute for direct medical advice.

When you arrive at a new doctor’s office, before you actually see the doctor, the office staff will ask you to fill out paper work to establish your patient chart. At Mount Sinai Queens, this information is entered into an electronic medical record which is designed to follow you through the Mount Sinai Hospital in Queens and Manhattan. Demographics, insurance information, health history including allergies and medications taken are all crucial to a comprehensive chart. The office staff will need to make a copy of your insurance card and need to see identification so be sure and bring those with you. Read more

Ear Deformities and Bullying

Guest Post by Joseph J Rousso, MD, Assistant Professor, Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Co-director of Cleft Lip, Palate, Microtia & Ear Anomalies services at The New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, New York, NY. To make an appointment with Dr. Rousso, call 212-535-2298.

Joseph J Rousso, MDThe feelings of angst, desperation, and hurt that a parent feels when their child is born with an ear malformation are indescribable. It leads to parental guilt, even though ear malformations are in no way the parents doing, and uncertainty about their child’s future and how they will be treated by their peers. About 5 percent of the population is born with what can be classified as an ear deformity, and yet so little attention is given to this subject matter. Read more

The Three-Legged Stool of Well Being (Hint: There is a fourth leg: reduce stress)

Dr. Sarah Van WagnerWelcome back to Mount Sinai Queens’ brand new blog featuring useful news and tips to help you lead a healthier life. I am Dr. Sarah Van Wagner, a board-certified family medicine physician who works at Mount Sinai Queens’ Steinway Medical Group. Please remember that this information is not a substitute for direct medical advice.

It is not always easy to stay healthy. Your cubicle mate comes to the office with a bad cold. Your favorite sushi place loses its “A” rating and your digestive system pays the price. Your weekend basketball game includes a bad landing and a sprained ankle…. However, no matter the circumstance, maintaining a healthy foundation will help you stay healthy, and help you recover faster if you get sick or injured. Read more

How To Pick the PCP That’s Right For You (Hint: Finding a doctor that accepts your health plan is only the first step)

Dr. Sarah Van WagnerWelcome back to Mount Sinai Queens’ brand new blog featuring useful news and tips to help you lead a healthier life. I am Dr. Sarah Van Wagner, a board-certified family medicine physician who works at Mount Sinai Queens’ Steinway Medical Group. Please remember that this information is not a substitute for direct medical advice.

You want to enter into a long-term relationship with your Primary Care Physician (PCP). Like any relationship, you should try to find the person that best meets your needs. As I mentioned in my last blog post – there are several different types of doctors who are PCPs: Read more

Simple Split Pea Soup

Guest post by Kelly Hogan, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian who has worked within the Mount Sinai Hospital for the past three years, now focusing on breast cancer nutrition for the Dubin Breast Center. Kelly provides individual counseling in the areas of wellness, weight management and symptom/side effect management, in addition to creating patient education and wellness programs.

Simple Split Pea SoupFood and nutrition-related trends come and go, and while I’m happy to see some have quieted down a bit (bye, fat free everything) I’m even more elated that others seem to be sticking around for a while. Here are a few of my favorites of late and ones I think will be even bigger in 2016. Read more

Three nutrition goals for 2016 (and a healthy recipe to start your New Year!)

Guest post by Kelly Hogan, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian who has worked within the Mount Sinai Hospital for the past three years, now focusing on breast cancer nutrition for the Dubin Breast Center. Kelly provides individual counseling in the areas of wellness, weight management and symptom/side effect management, in addition to creating patient education and wellness programs.

New YearIt’s that time of year, the month of December is often full of holiday parties, traditions and yes, cookies and cocktails. These indulgences can add up over time, and if you’re like the average American, you may have gained a pound or two by the time January 1 rolls around.

When it comes to New Year’s goals, I often see patients come to me with thoughts on not having this food, avoiding that food, swearing off essential nutrients (e.g., carbs or fat) or drastically cutting calories as a means for weight loss or even just to “get healthy.” Not only are these strategies rarely necessary, but also too drastic to last much longer than those cheap rain boots during the first January snowstorm. Read more